It’s ok to be not ok

It’s a tough time of year for a lot of people behind all the celebrations and cheer.

Family and financial pressures can be at their highest point of the year and if you are struggling with low mood, depression or anxiety the thought alone of all the social commitments, gatherings, work do’s and getting the christmas shopping done can bring additional stress.

If you are suffering with a chronic illness and pain, fatigue or mobility are an issue, then trying to keep up with all these commitments at this time of year or explain why you can’t make it to that party can be daunting and add additional pressure into an already difficult situation.

I therefore urge you to remember that it’s ok to be not ok. Those that care and love you will understand and if you don’t have any one to talk to and you are struggling, please use the following areas of support below. As someone who has been in those dark places because of my health and went far too long without talking to someone in the past, I beg you.

(N.b these are contact details for people in the UK, if you are in another country and don’t know where to go for help, email me at contact@joelvsarthritis.co.uk and I will do everything I can to get you the information you need. Happy to talk if that would help.

Help and support

Samaritans – for everyone, 24hrs a day, 7 days a week
Call 116 123

Childline – for children and young people under 19
Call 0800 1111 – the number won’t show up on your phone bill

Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) – for men
Call 0800 58 58 58 – 5pm to midnight every day

Worried about someone else?

If you are worried about someone else, the NHS’ advice is:

If you’re worried about someone, try to get them to talk to you. Ask open-ended questions like: “How do you feel about…?”

Don’t worry about having the answers. Just listening to what someone has to say and taking it seriously can be more helpful.

See Samaritans’ tips on how to start a difficult conversation.

Rethink also has advice on how to support someone who is having suicidal thoughts.

Don’t worry about having the answers. Just listening to what someone has to say and taking it seriously can be more helpful.

See Samaritans’ tips on how to start a difficult conversation.

Rethink also has advice on how to support someone who is having suicidal thoughts.

#ItsOkayToBeNotOkay

Please share. It might save someone’s life.

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